Fred Hubbell speaks about his plan to reform Medicaid in Iowa, raise state incomes and improve environmental health such as water and air quality. Hubbell spoke to a crowd of about 50 people Sunday evening while campaigning in Carroll.
Fred Hubbell speaks about his plan to reform Medicaid in Iowa, raise state incomes and improve environmental health such as water and air quality. Hubbell spoke to a crowd of about 50 people Sunday evening while campaigning in Carroll.

September 11, 2018

For Christine and Bill Simmons of Carroll, it was important to ensure that the candidate for governor would fight to restore collective bargaining rights to teachers and other public-sector union workers if elected.

They wanted to hear what their potential governor had to say about funding mental health facilities and creating more beds in hospitals throughout Iowa.

Connie Bock of Glidden wanted to meet the candidate and hear his plan for deprivatizing Medicaid and funding mental health programs for youth in rural areas.

After listening to Fred Hubbell speak this weekend, all three of them knew they were hearing exactly what they were looking for in a governor.

Policies like Hubbell’s were what brought a crowd of about 50 people out Sunday to listen to what the candidate had to say and learn why he is running to be Iowa’s next governor.

On the final push of his campaign tour before the Nov. 6 election, where he’ll face Republican incumbent Kim Reynolds on the ballot, Hubbell stopped by the Carroll County Democrats headquarters Sunday evening to speak about his plans if he is elected governor this fall.

Before Hubbell’s speech, Tim Gannon, an Iowa candidate for secretary of agriculture, spoke about the importance of electing Democrats this fall and shared why electing candidates like himself and Hubbell is so important for Iowa.

“We’ve always been a fairly balanced group,” he said. “We go a little bit this way, a little bit this way. Well, we’ve gone too far one way. So we need to correct that.”

Gannon said Iowa needs to better fund research institutions such as Iowa State University to support their efforts to boost agriculture — something that will create more jobs in rural Iowa, he added.

“We’ve got two months,” Gannon said. “All of the candidates on the ticket need your help. What you are planning to do between now and November, hopefully you will find time to do even more.”

After Gannon’s speech, Hubbell spoke to the crowded room about his will to win.

“I’m not running to lose, I’m running to win and get Democrats elected up and down the ticket,” he said. “It starts with electing a governor that’s got the leadership, experience and the skills to be able to produce a balanced budget and that has the right priorities.”

The priorities Hubbell focused on were education and job training, ending privatization of Medicaid, improving mental health service and environmental health and restoring collective bargaining rights to union workers.

When it comes to improving the water and air quality, Hubbell said, the problem cannot be blamed on the rural-urban divide — it is up to the entire state to improve the environment.

“It’s an Iowa issue,” he said. “It always has been. We have to work together to find a long-term solution.”

On the topic of restoring collective bargaining rights, which give public-sector union workers the rights to bargain for more than just wages, Hubbell said his plan will help attract higher-quality jobs throughout the state.

His plan is to invest in all Iowans, Hubbell said.

“I want to be the governor that’s going to stand up for everybody,” he said. “Not just Democrats. We need a governor that’s going to stand up for all Iowans and work with all Iowans.”

After Hubbell’s speech, Connie Simmons said she used to work in health care and is glad she doesn’t anymore because of funding cuts and lack of beds for patients.

Connie Bock also expressed her concerns with the state’s mental health funding.

“I wanted to meet him because I am a good Democrat, and I watch the public TV shows,” she said. “We need mental health facilities. We don’t have it here.”

After listening to Hubbell, Bock said her beliefs aligned with Hubbell’s priorities. She said he talked about everything that is needed in Iowa.

I am just here to get a Democrat in because we need it,” Bock said.