Bill Croghan, 64, a longtime deputy with the Carroll County Sheriff’s Office, died Monday. Croghan, who was being treated for lung cancer, was running against Sheriff Ken Pingrey for the position in next week’s election.
Bill Croghan, 64, a longtime deputy with the Carroll County Sheriff’s Office, died Monday. Croghan, who was being treated for lung cancer, was running against Sheriff Ken Pingrey for the position in next week’s election.

November 2, 2016

If Bill Croghan — who died Monday — is voted sheriff by Carroll County residents next week, county supervisors will need to appoint a replacement or hold a special election.

Croghan, 64, of Templeton, died just months after being diagnosed with lung cancer.

Croghan was a longtime law officer in Carroll County and worked for the police department and sheriff’s office, where he was most recently a deputy.

He is a challenger of Sheriff Ken Pingrey, a former chief deputy of the department who was appointed sheriff in March after the retirement of Sheriff Doug Bass.

Croghan died too close to the Tuesday election to remove his name from the ballot.

About 3,500 people had voted early as of Tuesday afternoon, said Kourtney Irlbeck, auditor for Carroll County.

Croghan’s cancer treatments kept him from actively campaigning in recent months. He was forced to skip a local candidate forum in October but resolved to see his candidacy to fruition.

“The doctors have reported the treatments are working, and the spot on my lung is shrinking,” Croghan wrote in an open letter to voters in September. “(My) doctor advised me to continue with the campaign.”

Croghan, a former sergeant in the Iowa Army National Guard, worked in law enforcement in Carroll County for 43 years.

“Deputy Bill Croghan touched many lives in his career with both the Carroll Police Department and the Carroll County Sheriff’s Office,” Pingrey told the Daily Times Herald. “He truly loved his job and interacting with the public. He will be missed by all.”

If Croghan wins the election and county supervisors choose to appoint a replacement rather than hold a special election — which Irlbeck estimates would cost in excess of $10,000 — residents could petition for an election with 150 signatures of eligible voters.