Students at Fairview look at their hands underneath a “germ” light before and after washing their hands to see the difference a little soap and water can make. The light turned the germs pink.
Students at Fairview look at their hands underneath a “germ” light before and after washing their hands to see the difference a little soap and water can make. The light turned the germs pink.
Kindergarten students at Fairview learned how to stop spreading germs during a session with an Iowa State University youth coordinator Friday.

Anjanette Treadway, a youth coordinator for Iowa State Extension and Outreach, read students a book titled "Those Mean Nasty Dirty Downright Disgusting but...Invisible Germs."

The book was about a girl named Beth who had a new kind of germ jump onto her hands every time she touched something. The germs caused sore throats, colds, runny noses and the flu.

Students learned that Beth never became sick because she washed the germs off her hands by using soap and warm water.

Treadway asked students when are the best times to wash their hands.

They replied "after using the bathroom" and "before eating."

Treadway taught the students that they should also be washing their hands after playing with pets at home, after playing on the playground, after sneezing or coughing, and before they touch open wounds.

She told them that germs were attracted to warm, wet places so they should use warm water when washing their hands.

Treadway told the students it's also important to bring their hands out of the water while scrubbing them with soap.

She told the students to sing "Happy Birthday" to themselves while washing their hands. It takes about the time to sing the song to make sure they get clean.

Treadway also taught the students to keep their hands out of their eyes, nose and mouth.

The session for the students came at the right time, as Iowa has been under a flu epidemic for two weeks.

As many as 80 students in one day have been absent at Fairview because of illness.

Last week, Carroll Community Schools also sent out a warning to parents encouraging them to get students vaccinated from pertussis, or whooping cough, due to a recent outbreak in school.

If parents want their student vaccinated, they can download a consent form from the Health Services website and return it to the school by Jan. 23.