Todd Jansonius (left) and Dan Dreessen, stars of the Velocity TV show “Extreme Auto Hunters,” play a custom-made “exhaust trumpet” that makes an appearance in one of their zany episodes. Jansonius built the makeshift bugle at Todd’s Exhaust Pros, the Carroll shop that Jansonius and his wife Nancy own.
Todd Jansonius (left) and Dan Dreessen, stars of the Velocity TV show “Extreme Auto Hunters,” play a custom-made “exhaust trumpet” that makes an appearance in one of their zany episodes. Jansonius built the makeshift bugle at Todd’s Exhaust Pros, the Carroll shop that Jansonius and his wife Nancy own.
July 18, 2014



They are the "extreme auto hunters," and in a new cable television show on the Velocity channel, they fly an experimental plane over cornfields and creeks to find hidden muscle cars to buy and sell.

And they're from Carroll.

They are:

- Todd Jansonius, colloquially known as "the muffler man" for owning Todd's Exhaust Pros for the past 25 years at the corner of U.S. Highway 30 and North Grant Road.

He's the handsome smooth-talker.

- Nancy Jansonius, the token "hot wife" of the show with the aw-shucks talk and limited patience for her husband's antics.

- Rex Jansonius, Todd's brother who pilots the yellow, low-flying plane and makes an emergency landing in the first episode.

- Dan Dreessen, "their crazy friend," as the show's intro says. Dreessen, who works the Daily Times Herald printing press each weekday, delivers the show's one-liners. Like this: "I approached this old car like it was my old girlfriend from high school - I wanted to touch everything on it."

A kazoo sometimes plays in the background while he walks.

The show's first of eight episodes aired last month. For those who missed it, there's a six-hour marathon that starts Saturday at 7 p.m.

Bill Brown, of the Glidden-based Dashboard Productions, filmed and produced the show this past fall and winter, but there was no guarantee that anyone would buy and air it.

But then Dreessen got a text message on his cellphone from Todd Jansonius.

"Can you meet me over here?" it said. "You wouldn't believe me if I told you."

The first season of the show - they don't know whether it will continue for another - won't make them rich, and to say the extreme auto hunters are now famous might be a stretch.

But as Dreessen put it: "It was the easiest, funnest, part-time job I've had."