Children chalked the sidewalk along East 18th Street near Fairview Elementary Friday night in rememberance of Kadyn Sporrer, 6, of Carroll. (Photos by Jared Strong)
Children chalked the sidewalk along East 18th Street near Fairview Elementary Friday night in rememberance of Kadyn Sporrer, 6, of Carroll. (Photos by Jared Strong)

June 17, 2019

The sun had waned when a family parked at Fairview Elementary Friday night, and a little girl ran from the vehicle, giggling here and there.

Her mother admonished her.

This wasn’t a time for play.

But it was OK.

A little girl isn’t supposed to know what it means to a community when a boy — a year or two older than her — dies.

Sure she might have been told that water is dangerous, but she doesn’t know what it means to drown.

More than 150 kids and parents gathered at Fairview Elementary that night to scrawl on the sidewalk with all colors of chalk and stand in a circle with lit candles.

They drew rainbows and firetrucks — Kadyn Sporrer’s dad is a volunteer firefighter for Carroll. Kadyn, 6, was awed by the trucks.

They drew words.

Fly high, Kadyn.

You will be missed.

And they gathered in a circle on the playground where Kadyn had played with his friends as a kindergarten student this past school year.

Lighters clicked amid the subtle chatter as another young girl held a speaker in her hands.

The group heard “Somewhere over the Rainbow” and its soft ukulele strums.

And after it ended and a woman told everyone to keep Kadyn’s family in their hearts, some of the kids quietly begged their parents to run and swing and slide on the playground equipment.

It was OK.

Little kids aren’t supposed to know what it means.

Little kids aren’t supposed to die.