Carroll Historic Preservation Commission chairwoman Barbara Hackfort (left) and vice cairwoman Vicki Gach display part of the design for a new two-year calendar the commission plans to start selling in October. Daily Times Herald photo by Douglas Burns
Carroll Historic Preservation Commission chairwoman Barbara Hackfort (left) and vice cairwoman Vicki Gach display part of the design for a new two-year calendar the commission plans to start selling in October. Daily Times Herald photo by Douglas Burns
Tuesday, August 28, 2012

Carroll City Manager Gerald Clausen said the request is almost unprecedented.

An organization wants to give money back to the city?

That’s exactly what the Carroll Historic Preservation Commission plans to do with an estimated $2,000 in proceeds from sales of a two-year calendar (2013 and 2014) that is expected to go on the market in October.

The commission plans to print 400 calendars and sell them for $5 each.

“They are great, and the photography is wonderful,” said Councilwoman Carolyn Siemann after viewing the layout design during a council meeting Monday.

At the request of Historic Preservation Commission chairwoman Barbara Hackfort the council advanced the organization $1,781 for production of the calendars — money Hackfort says will be returned as sales are made.

“I’m laughing because this is not normal,” Clausen said. “We usually don’t get money back.”

In 2012 the commission, which receives $500 in annual funding from the city, printed 300 calendars and gave them away as a promotion.

“It generated a lot of discussion,” Hackfort said.

The calendars contain historic and modern information and photos about Carroll.

Historic Commission vice chairwoman Vicki Gach said she used old newspapers to generate much of the content.

Mayor Adam Schweers said it makes sense to develop the calendar in a two-year package.

The calendars will be available at various locations in Carroll, and commission members plan to sell them as well.

“I really like what you guys do,” said Councilman Jeff Scharfenkamp.

He added, “History is important to our community.”