Davey Kock’s brother, Dan Kock, assisted in gathering bids at the live auction that took place during the Birthday Bash held in Davey’s honor. The former Ar-We-Va girls’ basketball coach died in 2012 after being diagnosed with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The state tournament basketball and holder brought in $450 and was purchased by the Kock brothers’ dad, Kenny, of Vail.
Davey Kock’s brother, Dan Kock, assisted in gathering bids at the live auction that took place during the Birthday Bash held in Davey’s honor. The former Ar-We-Va girls’ basketball coach died in 2012 after being diagnosed with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The state tournament basketball and holder brought in $450 and was purchased by the Kock brothers’ dad, Kenny, of Vail.
November 20, 2013



Janine Kock wanted the silk bouquet of purple irises the auctioneer was holding up.

It was the first item being sold during the live auction at the Birthday Bash event Janine helped organize and host Saturday. On that day, her husband, Davey Kock, would have turned 55 - a day after Janine, editor and publisher of The Observer in Westside, turned 54.

Davey was the Ar-We-Va High School girls basketball coach and worked for a group of hog producers around the Midwest. He died Sept. 25, 2012, after being diagnosed with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Janine's goal for the event was to raise thousands of dollars for research she hopes will help find a cure for the disease.

Some of that money would go to the Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Foundation in New York City, which claims as its symbol the same flower that was on the auctioning block Saturday. Kock wanted that bouquet.

But someone else in the crowd wanted it, too - and as the bidding climbed, Kock dropped out and lost. Then, a surprising thing happened.

A high-school friend of hers approached and gave her the bouquet he'd just bought for $500.

That set the mood for the rest of the bidding during a night that ended up raising more than $40,000 for CJD research.

Larry Siebert, who was Davey's assistant coach at Ar-We-Va, won the bidding for several autographed photos of Ed Podolak, radio announcer and former player for the Iowa Hawkeyes, that he'd had since 1973 and donated for the auction. After winning his own the photos, though, he donated them back to the auction a second time so that someone else could win them. The photos ended up bringing in $2,800 between the two rounds of auctioning - the highest-bid item of the night.

At one point during the evening, one of the Ar-We-Va girls' basketball players rushed home to get one of the basketballs from the state tournament to be auctioned. Several of the players, who served as waitresses during the event, spoke about Davey before the basketball brought in $450. The winner was Davey's father.

Another bidder ended up paying about $600 for eggs.

"It seemed every time we turned around, an item was bringing in more than it was worth," Janine said. "It was neat. We sat there kind of in awe."

The live auction followed a pork tenderloin dinner and a silent auction and raffle. The night ended with a dance, led by live music from a Perry band called Rukkus, whose lead singer, Mark Einck, is a longtime friend of the Kocks and sang at their wedding 30 years ago.

The auction was overseen by Will Epperly and Jon Schaben of the Dunlap Livestock Auction. Epperly, who is up to represent Iowa in the World Livestock Auctioneer Championship, was a hit among the women in the crowd, Kock said - some of them hoped he would be auctioned off at the end of the evening.

The numbers associated with the event stacked up. About 70 people contributed items to the salad bar served at the dinner. More than 70 items were contributed for the live auction, which ended up raising more than $27,000. There were about 60 items donated for the silent auction, which brought in about $5,000, and another 60 for the raffle held throughout the evening. Between the raffle and free-will donations, another $8,200 was raised. When donations from after the event and money that was raised beforehand are added in, about $50,000 will be donated for CJD research.

"It was just beyond our wildest dreams," Kock said. "It seemed everybody there was behind this and wanted this to be a great success, and that turned out to be the case."

Part of the money will help fund a research grant at the CJD Foundation - it will take a $10,000 donation and combine it with others for a $40,000 research grant. The remaining proceeds will be split. Half will go to the CJD Foundation to benefit a family support program that will spread awareness of the disease. The other half will go the National Prion Disease Pathology Surveillance Center in Cleveland, which does extensive research on CJD.

Anyone who wants to donate to the CJD Foundation in Davey's memory still can; they can either send donations to The Observer in Westside or donate using the link on the event's Facebook page, Birthday Bash CJD Fundraiser in Memory of Davey Kock.

Janine's contact at the CJD Foundation said this could be the largest fundraiser that has ever been held to benefit the foundation.

"Whether somebody who threw five bucks in there, or one of these people who spent $1,000 at the auction, everything together is going to make a big difference," Janine said.