“Model Farm” was one of the stations at the Iowa State University Extension Safety Day Camp on Sept. 10 and 11 at Swan Lake State Park. Elementary students from Adams, Kuemper Catholic, IKM-Manning and Ar-We-Va attended the camp. Studying a model farm to find potential hazards are Adams fourth-graders Kayla McCoullough, CJ Martin, Taylor Birks, Haley Berger and Chrystal Carreno. Carroll Area FFA students were presenters at this station.
“Model Farm” was one of the stations at the Iowa State University Extension Safety Day Camp on Sept. 10 and 11 at Swan Lake State Park. Elementary students from Adams, Kuemper Catholic, IKM-Manning and Ar-We-Va attended the camp. Studying a model farm to find potential hazards are Adams fourth-graders Kayla McCoullough, CJ Martin, Taylor Birks, Haley Berger and Chrystal Carreno. Carroll Area FFA students were presenters at this station.
Thursday, September 20, 2012

The nearly 275 fourth-graders from four Carroll County school districts last week learned to be aware of a number of common dangers they may encounter in daily living and how to respond to potential trouble.

Iowa State University Extension and Outreach’s Carroll office coordinated Safety Day Camp at Swan Lake State Park’s Conservation Education Center. Students attended from Adams Elementary and Kuemper Catholic in Carroll, Ar-We-Va in Westside and IKM-Manning in Manning and Irwin.

Stations at the camp included Chemical Lookalike, Recreational Safety, Internet Safety, Railroad Safety, First Aid, Farm Safety and Fire Safety.

Originally, the safety camps focused on just farm dangers but now have expanded to other areas.

ISU Extension and Outreach families and youths program coordinator Anjanette Treadway explains the camp was made multi-focus in response to the change in demographics, as farm population has declined significantly.

Treadway said, “We started incorporating more things they encounter on a day-to-day basis, such as the Internet; obviously railroad safety is huge in Carroll; the chemical safety teaches them that if you come up on a bottle that’s unmarked, leave it be because you never know what’s in that bottle; and with the recreation safety all of them go out and about do fun stuff.

“We still do have a farm-safety component to it because there are still kids who live on farms or their grandparents live on farms. We still need be aware of what’s going on there.”

Treadway said students at the camp every year do a great job of participation and paying attention to lessons that can serve them well.

Station leaders, she said, keep things upbeat and fun and use a lot of hands-on participation.

She added, “We just want the kids to be more aware of what’s going on around, knowing that accidents happen but sometimes we can avoid those accidents just by paying attention and by knowing. Knowledge is a huge tool in anything.”

For example, she noted, “Going through day-to-day life, you might run into something inappropriate on Internet. And you’ll think, ‘Wait, what did they tell me to do now?’”