Mildred Ramsey, 102: “Going through the Depression, that was rough. The ‘30s were bad. I just remember a lot of people were getting a lot of food from the county. I can remember that. They had days that you could go up there and get sacks of cornmeal and I don’t know what else. I can remember one woman went up to the courthouse and beat up on the person that was handing out the food. She grabbed him and went after him. Things weren’t going right, I guess.”
Mildred Ramsey, 102: “Going through the Depression, that was rough. The ‘30s were bad. I just remember a lot of people were getting a lot of food from the county. I can remember that. They had days that you could go up there and get sacks of cornmeal and I don’t know what else. I can remember one woman went up to the courthouse and beat up on the person that was handing out the food. She grabbed him and went after him. Things weren’t going right, I guess.”

March 19, 2018

Carroll’s senior citizens have stories to share.

Memories of living through the Great Depression. Stories about escaped circus monkeys. Advice and humor that only can be passed on after 90-plus years of living.

Jacob Fiscus, of Photography by Fiscus, and Rebecca McKinsey with the Daily Times Herald, are seeking to share some of those stories with a photo project called “Hindsight,” featuring a dozen area people aged 89 and older.

The project will be displayed at the Photography by Fiscus studio, located at 507 N. Main St. in Carroll, from 5-8 p.m. Friday, March 23.

Photos of the senior citizens will be on display, along with their words, and the project’s creators will be available to answer questions.

Beverages will be served at the event.

This is the second project of this type Fiscus and McKinsey have completed. The first, “People of the Library,” which told how Carroll-area citizens of a variety of ages use and enjoy the Carroll Public Library, was released last July.

Fiscus and McKinsey are working on future projects focusing on a variety of topics, which all together are being presented under the name of “Faces of Iowa.” They are available for viewing online at www.thefacesofiowa.com.