Kobe Hass, a student at Carroll High and a member of the HyperStream Club, helps Jeannine Muhlbauer with a tablet and some of the issues she was having during the Day of Devices held at the Carroll Public Library Wednesday. The seminar was a way students could help individuals in the community with technology issues.
Kobe Hass, a student at Carroll High and a member of the HyperStream Club, helps Jeannine Muhlbauer with a tablet and some of the issues she was having during the Day of Devices held at the Carroll Public Library Wednesday. The seminar was a way students could help individuals in the community with technology issues.

February 9, 2018

Carroll-area residents and high-school students sat side by side to learn about technology this week.

Students from Carroll High School’s HyperStream tech club visited Carroll Public Library for a “Day of Devices” Thursday, offering tips on using tablets, smartphones and more to library visitors.

The afternoon allowed the HyperStream students to complete a required service project while helping others, said Kelly Borchers, a gifted and talented teacher at Carroll Community Schools.

“I think they need to be able to feel comfortable sharing their knowledge and their technology backgrounds, and this is a perfect opportunity in a way that feels like they’re helping in a positive way,” Borchers said.

Right now, only boys are involved in HyperStream at Carroll High School, but Borchers said she is trying to change that.

She has girls involved in the high school’s Tiger Vision, a student-run advertising and multimedia class. The class helps prepare students for college and their future careers.

Girls from Tiger Vision help mentor middle-school students in the MakerSquad club, similar to the HyperStream club, in the hopes of recruiting more female students to the high-school clubs, Borchers said.

It is something that impacts both Carroll and Kuemper,” Borchers said. “We’ve been doing these programs for quite a while, and Kuemper’s been doing it since it originally started. So I think (it’s) just being able to give the kids the good background, knowing that they’re moving into that 21st century and have the coding background.”