Carroll Middle School seventh-grade students (from left) Joewie Heithoff, Brooke Reiling and Lily Wiltse, who participated in a regional Junior/Senior History Day contest March 15 in Storm Lake with a group documentary called “Tinker vs. Des Moines: On the Road to Peace,” qualify for the upcoming state contest.
Carroll Middle School seventh-grade students (from left) Joewie Heithoff, Brooke Reiling and Lily Wiltse, who participated in a regional Junior/Senior History Day contest March 15 in Storm Lake with a group documentary called “Tinker vs. Des Moines: On the Road to Peace,” qualify for the upcoming state contest.

April 9, 2018

Two Carroll Middle School groups will present their takes on historical conflict and compromise at a state contest later this month.

The Carroll Community School District participated in a regional Junior/Senior History Day contest March 15 at Buena Vista University in Storm Lake, with 22 Carroll middle- and high-school students responding to the National History Day theme of “Conflict and Compromise in History” with papers, exhibits, performances, websites and documentaries.

Of those, two groups of seven students total qualified for the state contest, which will be held at the Iowa Events Center in Des Moines April 30.

“History Day students learn the skills and techniques of the historian to discover new insights,” said Kelly Borchers, gifted and talented instructor and academic competition moderator at Carroll schools, in a news release.

In addition to crafting a project, students develop a process paper and annotated bibliography to explain their research.

“The National History Day Program’s goal is to empower students with research skills, critical-thinking skills and outlets for creative expression, which will enhance their academic abilities in all areas of study,” Borchers said.

The following students participated in the contest:

— Joelle Cheney and Lexi Schuur, with an exhibit called “Lafayette: Creating Compromise in the Midst of Worldly Conflicts,” which won an ROTC Outstanding Senior Entry in Military History award.

— Nolan Landauer and Collin Schultes, with an exhibit called “The Gentlemen’s Agreement: Surrender at Appomattox,” which won an Outstanding Project on Civil War Topic award.

— Brooke Fortner, Chloey Steffes and Tayonna Gotto, with an exhibit called “Salem Witch Trials: Mass Murder of the Innocent,” which won a Women’s History Award.

— Bret Muhlbauer and Mercedes Warnke, with an exhibit called “Apollo-Soyuz Mission: The Handshake to End the Space Race,” which won a Best Use of Archival Research award.

— Sophia Polking, Shay Sinnard and Chelsea Chandler, with an exhibit called “A. Phillip Randolph: The Man Behind Executive Order 8802.” The order signed by President Franklin Roosevelt aimed to eliminate racial discrimination in the U.S. defense industry.

— Wyatt Ladwig, Andrew Dieter and Bryton Treadway, with a documentary called “Executive Order 9066: Life Within Barbed Wires.” The order led to the country’s relocation of people with Japanese ancestry during World War II.

— Alyssa Brant, Brittan Pudenz, Samantha Tidgren and Brooklyn Schulte, with an exhibit called “Office of Civilian Defense: When Militarization Meets Everyday Life,” which won an Outstanding Junior Entry in Military History and qualified for the state contest.

Lily Wiltse, Brooke Reiling and Joewie Heithoff, with a documentary called “Tinker vs. Des Moines: On the Road to Peace,” which qualified for the state contest. The 1969 U.S. Supreme Court ruling protected students’ First Amendment rights to free speech.