Longtime Carroll veterinarian and Library Foundation president Mitch Hiscocks started Aug. 1 as a professor at Iowa State University. Hiscocks played a key role in development of the modernized library, pictured here.
Longtime Carroll veterinarian and Library Foundation president Mitch Hiscocks started Aug. 1 as a professor at Iowa State University. Hiscocks played a key role in development of the modernized library, pictured here.

August 6, 2019

The quiet, determined force behind the development of the modern library in Carroll is taking his love of learning to another pursuit.

Mitch Hiscocks, the outgoing president of the Carroll Library Foundation, started Aug. 1 as a professor of veterinary diagnostics and field services at Iowa State University in Ames. He will be living in rural Madrid with his wife, Dawn, after three decades in Carroll.

Hiscocks, 55, is leaving his practice at the Carroll Veterinary Clinic, which he’s been a part of since 1989, just after he graduated from veterinary school at Iowa State.

“I still have my health,” Hiscocks said. “I still have a great interest in veterinary medicine, and I have something to share. I’m going to feed energy off of these students.”

Hiscocks will work with students in the final stages of their veterinary education at Iowa State, one of the premier universities in the nation for that field. He will guide students through hands-on work on Iowa farms, preparing them to enter the profession and mend and manage the health of large livestock.

“Carroll, Iowa, has been wonderful for what I do,” said Hiscocks, who added he’ll essentially be a vessel for the talented livestock producers in Carroll and surrounding counties as he takes what he’s learned with them to Iowa State.

The credibility of Carroll County cattlemen and other ag businessmen in the region goes a long way, he said.

As for the library, Hiscocks has served as the president of the highly visible Library Foundation, which surpassed its fundraising goal of $2.5 million toward construction of a new library, a process that consumed years and hundreds of volunteer hours for Hiscocks. Prior to leading the foundation, he served on the city council-appointed Library Board of Trustees.

“What always impressed me about Mitch was his calm presence,” longtime Foundation board member Marilyn Setzler said. “He was never rattled. He was always this calming presence. I’ve really never met anybody like him, and I’ve met a lot of people.”

Hiscocks himself met with numerous donors to the library behind the scenes, traveling outside of Carroll on many occasions, to seek large and small contributions for the facility that now is well into construction. He also played a pivotal role in the grant-writing strategy.

“This has been a focus, the library,” Hiscocks said. “Libraries have done a lot for me.”

A native of a Britt farm 23 miles west of Mason City, Hiscocks spent more than half his life to this point in Carroll. The vet practice is in good hands, he said, with veterinarians Dr. John Hicks, Dr. Bryan Becker and Dr. Todd Nelson.

“They’ve been supportive throughout of me,” Hiscocks said.

The move to the acreage in Madrid puts Hiscocks closer to three of his four children: Elise Hempstead, 31, a West Des Moines cosmetologist who owns Bombshell Hair Design in West Glen, near Jordan Creek Mall; Sam, 29, who lives in Grimes and works as a planner for the Iowa Department of Transportation; and Dakota, 27, who lives in Granger and is a terminal manager for Ruan.

His oldest daughter, Morgan, 32, works with a letter-press operation in Minneapolis.

As for the library foundation, Cecelia Comito is the new president.

Editor’s Note: Douglas Burns is vice president of the volunteer, non-profit Carroll Library Foundation.