Get an up-close look at MoveIt’s solar array in Breda during an open house Thursday from 4 to 7 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.
Get an up-close look at MoveIt’s solar array in Breda during an open house Thursday from 4 to 7 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

October 11, 2017

Breda

Want to see how the latest in solar power works for a local company, how it pencils out to better the bottom line?

Head to Breda from 4 to 7 p.m. Thursday for an open house showcasing MoveIt’s ground-mounted solar installation.

The full public, including people from surrounding communities, is invited to attend.

The event starts at the Breda Golf Course with food, beverages, displays and information. Tours of the solar installation will then be available every half hour at MoveIt, a business that provides logistics support for shippers and lists brands such as Gatorade as customers.

Shell Rock, Iowa-based Current RE installed the solar array on the east side of MoveIt’s property. It consists of a 140-by-60-foot grid and 720 CAT (Caterpillar Inc.) 115-watt panels. The solar system has been operational for several weeks.

“We are looking at breaking even at around five to seven years,” said Todd Partridge, vice president for the MoveIt Companies. “Even without the tax credits solar is now a generally viable option. It is good for the local economies as it cuts energy expenses for customers, employs local contractors for construction and maintenance, and with favorably negotiated contracts, can save municipal utility money.”

The array has a warranty of 25 years, but Partridge expects it to function for far longer.

At a May meeting the Breda City Council passed a net metering agreement that allows solar energy that exceeds a customer’s demand to be sent back to the municipal utility.

“We are very grateful to the Breda City Council for their forward-thinking initiative,” Partridge said. “Breda has always been a progressive community, and this prepares the city take advantage of rapidly growing energy sources.”

Partidge said the point he is trying to drive home is that solar energy is a local product. Instead of sending money to coal country, Iowans can keep dollars circulating through local economies.

“The only people who believe that coal is the future are the people who live in West Virginia,” Partridge said.